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Mega Millions wants to know, do you have these numbers?

Mega Millions wants to know, do you have these numbers?

(CNN) - Across the United States people are scanning small white sheets of paper, hoping they have six numbers matching the ones drawn Friday night in the Mega Millions lottery.The numbers drawn a ... Continue Reading
New clues from 911 call emerge in case of missing Wisconsin girl

New clues from 911 call emerge in case of missing Wisconsin girl

(CNN) - A sheriff's department dispatch log reveals new information about the night that missing Wisconsin teenager Jayme Closs' parents were found dead -- including that a 911 call appeared to have come from her mother's cell phone, and that the door to the family's home had been kicked in.

Authorities have been searching for Jayme Closs, 13, since early Monday, when a mysterious 911 call led deputies to discover that her parents had been shot dead at the family's home in northwestern Wisconsin's Barron County.

Investigators say Jayme apparently vanished just after the shootings and is in danger. An Amber Alert was issued for her Monday, and the FBI has added her to its online list of kidnapped or missing people.

"We believe Jayme was in the home at the time of the homicides and we believe she's still in danger," Barron County Sheriff Chris Fitzgerald said this week.

The investigation began when someone called 911 shortly before 1 a.m. Monday. No one on the line talked to the dispatcher, but the dispatcher could hear a disturbance, authorities said.

Deputies responded about four minutes later and found Jayme's parents, James Closs, 56, and Denise Closs, 46, shot dead in their home outside the small city of Barron -- and Jayme was nowhere to be found, authorities said.

A city of 3,400, Barron is about 75 miles northeast of Minneapolis.

A dispatch log that the Barron County Sheriff's Department released Friday offers a few new details from that night:

• The dispatcher "could hear a lot of yelling" during the 911 call.

• The call was "pinged" to the Closs' home. When the dispatcher called the number back, a voicemail greeting indicated that the phone belonged to Denise Closs.

• A responding officer found "the door has been kicked in."

• The family dog was there when deputies arrived, and was eventually taken to a relative's home.

The log does not indicate who made the 911 call, who was yelling or what was being yelled.

Closs' parents were shot and their deaths have been ruled homicides, Fitzgerald said Wednesday. No gun was found at the scene, he said.

Investigators believe Jayme was at home during the shooting based on details from the 911 call and evidence from the home, Fitzgerald said.

"Is it a random attack or a targeted attack? I don't know that answer," Fitzgerald told reporters. "That's why those leads are so important."

Volunteers scour the area

Volunteers and law enforcement combed the sides of US 8 -- the road where the Closs' home is located -- on Thursday, looking for evidence. But they didn't turn up anything of value, Fitzgerald said.

Hours earlier, Fitzgerald asked for 100 volunteers to participate in Thursday's search, which took place about 3 miles from the family's home, according to CNN affiliate WCCO.

The Barron County Sherriff's Department has received more than 1,000 tips for missing teenager Jayme Closs, according to a news release on the department's Facebook page. Officials are asking the public to come forward with any information they may have about the Closs family and to remain vigilant in watching the behavior of others, as a change in normal behavior could lead police to additional tips, according to the release.

The sheriff said Thursday he has a "100% expectation that she's alive." He could not be reached for comment Friday.

Motive in parents' death is unclear

Deputies are also trying to determine who killed Jayme's parents, and why.

On HLN's "Crime & Justice" Wednesday night, Fitzgerald told host Ashleigh Banfield that additional agencies, including the FBI, are involved.

"They are the experts in breaking down 911 tapes, looking at our phones and taking care of all evidence in that manner," he said.

Joan Smrekar, who lives next door to the Closs home, told Banfield she heard two shots a couple of seconds apart just after 12:30 a.m. Monday.

"It was just, 'bang' and 'bang,'" Smrekar said.

Jayme Closs is 5 feet tall, weighs 100 pounds and has green eyes and blond or strawberry blond hair, the sheriff's department said. Anyone with information can call the tip line at 1-855-744-3879.

The federal investigation of the Catholic Church: What we know so far

The federal investigation of the Catholic Church: What we know so far

(CNN) - On Thursday we learned that federal prosecutors in Pennsylvania have taken a step long-sought by survivors of clergy sexual abuse: They launched a federal investigation into the Catholic Chur ... Continue Reading
Man imprisoned for more than 20 years says new evidence proves he didn't abuse his son

Man imprisoned for more than 20 years says new evidence proves he didn't abuse his son

CLEARWATER, Florida (CNN) - For more than 20 years, Jim Duncan has insisted he was wrongfully convicted of aggravated child abuse for breaking his infant son's bones in 1993. Now a Florida judge wi ... Continue Reading
LSU fraternity suspended for 'very serious' violations

LSU fraternity suspended for 'very serious' violations

(CNN) - Louisiana State University has put a fraternity on an "interim suspension" for what it says are violations of its student code of conduct.

LSU spokesman Ernie Ballard did not share the nature of the allegations against the Pi Kappa Phi fraternity chapter, but a statement released by the university said the fraternity is under investigation for "very serious" allegations.

"We cannot go into specific details at this time, but the university will fully investigate the claims," the school's statement said. "If they are substantiated, then appropriate action will be taken."

The alleged violation took place during this fall, according to a letter sent last week to the chapter's president from LSU Associate Dean of Students Jonathan Sanders.

The fraternity chapter did not respond to CNN's effort to contact it. In a statement, Victor Tran, Pi Kappa Phi's national interim assistant executive director of communications, said the fraternity would cooperate with LSU and expected its members to do so as well.

"We have also put our own interim suspension in place as the investigation continues," Tran said in a statement.

Pi Kappa Phi's suspension comes on the heels of anniversary of the death of LSU pledge Maxwell Gruver, who died last September after allegedly being forced to drink alcohol as part of a hazing ritual.

Gruver was pledging the Phi Delta Theta fraternity, which revoked the chapter's charter four days after the incident.

Gruver's parents have filed a $25 million lawsuit against the school, the fraternity and some of its members.

The Pi Kappa Phi fraternity also came under scrutiny at another school last November when 20-year-old Florida State University pledge Andrew Coffey died after a night of heavy drinking at an off-campus party.

Early this year nine men were charged with college hazing causing injury or death, but the charges were later dropped, the Tallahasee Democrat reported.

Pennsylvania Governor signs anti-hazing bill named for deceased Penn State student

Pennsylvania Governor signs anti-hazing bill named for deceased Penn State student

(CNN) - Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf signed a tough anti-hazing bill that bears the name of a Penn State student who died last year during fraternity pledging.

The bill signed Friday is named for Timothy Piazza, a 19-year-old engineering major whose excessive drinking on his first night pledging the Beta Theta Pi house led to a series of falls that resulted in a severe head injury and his death the next day, according to court records and testimony. Six men face hazing charges in Piazza's death.

The Timothy J. Piazza Anti Hazing Law requires Pennsylvania schools to have policies and reporting procedures in place to stop hazing and to inform students and parents of what is happening on campus.

For those found guilty of hazing, penalties could include fines, the withholding of a diploma, and academic punishments ranging from probation to expulsion. The strengthened penalties also now include a felony charge for aggravated hazing that results in serious injury or death.

The bill is a "crucial component" in the fight against hazing, Penn State spokeswoman Lisa Powers said. "This law, when passed, in conjunction with the aggressive safety and related measures the University has implemented, is another step toward our mutual goal to increase student safety on campuses. Penn State has been, and continues to be, committed to addressing this serious national issue," she said in a statement.

Penn State is also developing a national scorecard to provide public information on Greek letter organizations, including alcohol and hazing violations and chapter suspensions, according to a separate statement.

Beta Theta Pi's national organization publicly endorsed the bill as part of a settlement reached last month with Piazza's family.

"We have sadness in our hearts everyday without Tim in our lives, but are encouraged that this law will serve to hold accountable those who commit the crime of hazing which cost Tim his life, and by its deterrent effect will save the lives of young men and women like Tim," Jim Piazza, Timothy's father, said at the bill signing Friday.

National 'scourge of hazing'

There have been more than 77 fraternity-related deaths across the country since 2005. Forty-four states have anti-hazing laws in place -- Pennsylvania will be the 45th -- including at least 12 that make hazing a felony if it results in death or serious injury.

"Parents should not send their children off to college with the concern that they'll be injured or killed as a result of just trying to join an organization as was our son, Tim," Jim Piazza said.

Gov. Wolf praised the bill and the state legislators who passed the bill unanimously.

"Tim's tragic experience has led to real change. There is no place for hazing on our college campuses. And together, we will protect students and hold accountable those who engage in it," said Wolf. "We mourn for Tim's loss with his family, and while we can never fix what they've gone through, this new law will help to prevent other tragedies.

If you win the $1 billion Mega Millions jackpot, you could be richer than Taylor Swift

If you win the $1 billion Mega Millions jackpot, you could be richer than Taylor Swift

(CNN) - All week, the climbing Mega Millions and Powerball jackpots have been awakening the frivolous dreamers inside of us. Come on, who can resist entertaining some "what ifs" when the money at stake is over a billion dollars?

To recap, no one's won the big Powerball or Mega Millions payout for a long time, so now the jackpots are sinfully high. The Powerball pot is $470 million, and the top Mega Millions prize is a cool Dr. Evil-approved $1 billion. That makes it the second-largest drawing in US lottery history.

Granted, those numbers get pared down a LOT once cash value calculations and good old Uncle Sam get a hold of the winnings. But still, it's an obscene amount of money.

For some context, Taylor Swift's net worth is reportedly around $300 million. If you win the Mega Millions "billion," you could take home $565 million and be almost twice as rich as her with absolutely none of the work. Are you familiar with the Commonwealth of Dominica, a small island country in the West Indies? Their 2017 GDP was $562 million. You could literally be as rich as an entire country.

Even if you only won the Powerball jackpot and had to settle for the $248 million cash value payout, like a peasant, you could still be worth 0.82 Taylor Swifts and finally afford a comfortable two-bedroom in San Francisco.

The Mega Millions drawing is Friday at 11 p.m. ET. The next Powerball drawing is Saturday.

READ: These are your odds of winning Powerball or Mega Millions.

READ: What not to do when you win the lottery

Elizabeth Warren Fast Facts

Elizabeth Warren Fast Facts

(CNN) - Here's a look at the life of Democratic US Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts. Personal:Birth date: June 22, 1949 Birth place: Oklahoma City, Oklahoma Birth name: Elizabeth A ... Continue Reading
Former USA Gymnastics president arrested on charge of evidence tampering in Larry Nassar case

Former USA Gymnastics president arrested on charge of evidence tampering in Larry Nassar case

(CNN) - The former head of USA Gymnastics was arrested in connection with accusations he removed documents linked to the Larry Nassar sexual abuse case from the Karolyi Ranch gymnastics training facility in Texas, authorities said.

Steve Penny was arrested Wednesday, three weeks after he was indicted by a grand jury for tampering with evidence, the Walker County District Attorney's office said.

He was detained after US Marshals tracked him to a cabin in Gatlinburg, Tennessee. He is being held at the Sevier County Jail while awaiting extradition to Walker County, Texas.

A judge in Texas set his bail at $25,000. He has a court appearance there scheduled for October 29.

The indictment claims Penny ordered the removal of documents from the Karolyi Ranch in Walker County, Texas with "the purpose of impairing the ongoing investigation by destroying or hiding the documents," after he learned an investigation was underway, the Walker County District Attorney's office said.

Authorities claim the documents were later delivered to Penny at the USAG headquarters in Indianapolis, Indiana. The records are currently missing.

The documents would have helped law enforcement investigate Nassar and would have "assisted with the investigation of other offenses that may have occurred at the Karolyi Ranch," the district attorney's office said in a statement.

According to emails obtained by The New York Times, it appears that Penny also sought help from the FBI to protect the image of USA Gymnastics from negative publicity as the sex abuse scandal unfolded. He also told an FBI agent about a top security job with the US Olympic Committee, the newspaper reported.

CNN has not independently verified the contents of the emails.

When asked about the emails, Penny's attorney Edith Matthai told the newspaper that Penny made the request for help to counter claims that USAG had not reported athletes' allegations to the FBI.

Further, Matthai told CNN that Penny "had no authority to offer anyone a position with the USOC."

"Mr. Penny told (the agent) that the security position would open when the current head retired, and that (the agent), who he understood was retiring from the FBI, might be good for the position," Matthai said. "The position did not open up until well over a year later.

"This was normal ordinary networking. Any suggestion that Mr. Penny was attempting to influence the FBI investigation is false and defamatory."

The FBI declined to comment for the newspaper's article.

CNN is currently seeking comment from the FBI and USAG.

'This is for every little girl'

Matthai, Penny's attorney, said Penny was arrested while on vacation with his family in Tennessee and had no knowledge that there had been an indictment in Texas.

"If Mr. Penny had any idea he was sought in Texas this would have been appropriately handled through counsel without terrifying his family," Matthai said. She added that he is confident the facts will show he did nothing criminal.

In a statement, USA Gymnastics said Penny resigned from his role in March 2017.

"We support law enforcement's efforts and have fully cooperated with the investigations by the Texas Rangers, Congress and others, and will continue do so to help the survivors and our community heal from this tragedy," the organization said.

But three-time gold medalist Aly Raisman called out the US Olympic Committee and USA Gymnastics on Twitter, and highlighted past praise they'd offered to Penny.

"USAG, you treat your athletes who speak out as adversaries, but you have the nerve to state you continue to support athletes? Just because you say you support athletes in a press release or on twitter doesn't mean anything..." she wrote.

Rachael Denhollander, the first woman to accuse Nassar of abuse, praised the arrest on Facebook.

"This is for every little girl who could have been saved from Larry, and from every coach that Penny received warnings about, and then put into a file cabinet. They are worth it all. May justice continue to be done," she wrote.

If convicted of the third-degree felony charge, Penny could face up to 10 years in prison and up to a $10,000 fine.

Texas officials investigate Nassar case

Nassar was already serving 40 to 175 years in Michigan for sexually abusing women and girls under the guise of performing medical treatment when he was indicted in June on charges linked to allegations at the Karolyi Ranch.

Nassar is facing six counts of sexual assault of a child and former USA Gymnastics trainer Deborah Van Horn is facing one count of sexual assault of a child in Texas, prosecutors said.

The indictment followed an investigation by the Texas Rangers into possible misconduct at the ranch after victims' attorneys said Nassar abused many women and girls at the training center for years.

The Karolyi Ranch, a 2,000-acre compound about 70 miles north of Houston, is run by longtime gymnastics coaches Martha and Bela Karolyi. It became the US Women's National Team Training Center in 2001 and a US Olympic Training Site in 2011 -- during many of the same years Nassar was the national team doctor.

USA Gymnastics agreed to buy the Karolyi Ranch in 2016 after leasing the center for years but decided not to proceed with the purchase, citing a number of reasons including "unexpected financial expenditures." Earlier this year, the organization cut ties with the facility after several gymnasts, including Simone Biles -- one of the sport's most accomplished stars -- said they were abused by Nassar at the center.

Gov. Greg Abbott requested the investigation earlier this year saying the "recent, shocking allegations of sexual assault of athletes at the Karolyi Ranch in Walker County are deeply disturbing."

Some of Nassar's victims called on Texas officials to investigate what Martha Karolyi knew about Nassar's abuse at her training facility, but authorities cleared the Karolyis from any criminal wrongdoing in June.

"We do not believe there is any corroborative evidence with regard to Martha or Bela Karolyi that they did anything wrong," Walker County Assistant District Attorney Stephanie Stroud said at the time.

Stroud said the Karolyis were interviewed at length by investigators and they continue to cooperate with authorities.

After Nassar's indictment in June, prosecutors said the investigation is now focusing on USA Gymnastics.

The fallout from Nassar's case continues

Penny resigned from the top post at USA Gymnastics last year as the organization became embroiled in the Nassar sexual assault scandal. He had been USA Gymnastics president and chief executive officer for 12 years.

He has since declined to answer questions about the matter. In June, Penny invoked the Fifth Amendment when he appeared at a Senate hearing on the scandal.

He repeatedly refused to answer questions about Nassar and answered just one question to confirm his employment dates.

His attorney, Robert Bittman, released a statement after the hearing saying Perry devoted his career to promoting a safe environment for athletes.

"He is repulsed by Larry Nassar's crimes, and he feels nothing but compassion for the victims of those crimes. Today, on the advice of his attorney, Mr. Penny declined to testify before the subcommittee while the matters that attempt to wrongly shift blame for Nassar's crimes remain open," Bittman wrote.

USAG is struggling to recover from the scandal as several high-ranking officials have left the organization.

Penny's replacement, Kerry Perry, quit after just nine months on the job. She had been criticized for what many considered to be inadequate action during the Nassar abuse fallout.

Perry was replaced by former US Rep. Mary Bono who resigned less than a week after taking over.

Meanwhile, in August, after only three days on the job, elite development coordinator Mary Lee Tracy was asked to resign after she "inappropriately contacted a [Nassar] survivor, who is also a represented plaintiff, in response to that survivor's public criticism of her," USAG said.

And in May, USAG said the head of its women's program, Rhonda Faehn, was no longer with the organization. Then-CEO Perry would not say whether Faehn was fired or resigned, calling Faehn's departure a "personnel matter that we will not discuss in detail."

The search for missing Wisconsin teenager Jayme Closs continues

The search for missing Wisconsin teenager Jayme Closs continues

(CNN) - Volunteers and law enforcement combed the side of a highway on Thursday looking for evidence in the disappearance of a missing Wisconsin teenager whose parents were found dead in their home this week.

But the search along Highway 8 in Barron County, Wisconsin, didn't turn up anything of value, according to Barron County Sheriff Chris Fitzgerald.

Hours earlier, Fitzgerald asked for 100 volunteers to help in the routine search for evidence that could be related to the case as the search for Jayme Closs entered its fourth day.

The 13-year-old was likely at her family's Barron home, located on Highway 8, when her parents were shot dead, and she vanished moments later, investigators believe. Her whereabouts and safety are still in question.

"We believe Jayme was in the home at the time of the homicides and we believe she's still in danger," Fitzgerald said this week.

Thursday's search took place about 3 miles from the family's home, according to CNN affiliate WCCO.

Since authorities received a cryptic 911 call and discovered the bodies of Jayme's parents in their home near the town of Barron early Monday, investigators have received more than 800 tips and have not confirmed any credible sightings of the girl.

But the sheriff said he has a "100% expectation that she's alive."

An Amber Alert was issued Monday for Jayme and several law enforcement agencies have joined the search.

Motive in parents' death is unclear

Deputies are also trying to solve the killings of Jayme's parents, James Closs, 56, and Denise Closs, 46, in the small city of Barron.

During a 911 call shortly before 1 a.m. Monday, the dispatcher heard a disturbance in the background. But no one spoke directly to the dispatcher, Fitzgerald said.

When deputes arrived to the home less than four minutes later, Fitzgerald said, no one was in sight and no vehicles were in the immediate area.

Closs' parents were shot and their deaths have been ruled homicides, Fitzgerald said Wednesday. No gun was found at the scene, he said.

On HLN's "Crime & Justice" Wednesday night, Fitzgerald told host Ashleigh Banfield that deputies had recovered the cell phone from which the 911 call was made.

Fitzgerald said additional agencies, including the FBI, are involved. "They are the experts in breaking down 911 tapes, looking at our phones, and taking care of all evidence in that manner," he said.

Authorities said they have determined whose cell phone the call came from, but declined to identify the owner.

Investigators also believe Jayme was at home during the shooting based on details from the 911 call and evidence from the home.

"Is it a random attack or a targeted attack? I don't know that answer," Fitzgerald told reporters. "That's why those leads are so important."

Joan Smrekar, who lives next door to the Closs home, told Banfield she heard two shots a couple of seconds apart just after 12:30 a.m. Monday.

"It was just, 'bang' and 'bang,'" Smrekar said.

Relatives wait in agony

Seara Closs said she wishes she were the one endangered, not her cousin Jayme. Seara wrote an open letter to Jayme on Facebook.

"I'm going thru our family pictures, worrying sick about you 🙁 wishing we could trade places just to get you home and out of harms way," Seara Closs posted.

In her post, Seara reminded her cousin that her family -- including her slain parents -- love her dearly.

"Grandpa Jim (James) Closs, your Momma Bear, Denise Closs and your very own night [in] shinning armor, your Daddyo Jim JR Closs ... love all of you!" Seara Closs wrote.

Barron Area School District administrator Diane Tremblay said Jayme, a member of her school's cross-country team, is a "sweet girl who is a loyal friend and loves to dance."

During a recent school assignment, Jayme was asked what she would do with $1 million, Tremblay said. Jayme wrote that she would "feed the hungry and give the rest to the poor."

Both James and Denise Closs were long-time employees of the Jennie-O Turkey Store in Barron, Jennie-O's parent company Hormel said.

"Our thoughts are with the Closs family and the entire Barron community," said a statement from Jennie-O Turkey Store officials.

"This is a difficult time for our entire team and we are mourning this loss and are still processing this terrible tragedy. We are also hopeful for the safe return of their daughter, Jayme, and are keeping her and the Closs family in our thoughts."

Jayme Closs is 5 feet tall, weighs 100 pounds and has green eyes and blond or strawberry blond hair, the sheriff's department said. Anyone with information can call the tip line at 1-855-744-3879.

Correction: A prior version of this story incorrectly spelled the missing girl's last name.

US Justice Department investigating Catholic Church in Pennsylvania, Buffalo

US Justice Department investigating Catholic Church in Pennsylvania, Buffalo

(CNN) - The Department of Justice has subpoenaed at least seven of the eight Catholic dioceses in Pennsylvania as part of an investigation into abuse by priests.

The Archdiocese of Philadelphia, and the dioceses of Allentown, Erie, Greensburg, Harrisburg, Pittsburgh and Scranton acknowledged on Thursday they had received federal subpoenas.

"The Diocese of Pittsburgh has received the subpoena from the US Department of Justice and will cooperate fully with any and all investigations of the sexual abuse of minors by clergy in Pennsylvania," said spokesman the Rev. Nicholas S. Vaskov.

The department is also looking into the Diocese of Buffalo, New York, a source with knowledge of the federal subpoena told CNN.

Several groups that represent abuse survivors said this appears to be the first federal probe of this size and scope into sexual abuse by Catholic clergy in the United States. A spokesperson for the Department of Justice in Washington declined to comment.

The federal probes come on the heels of a damning grand jury report in Pennsylvania that found credible evidence that 301 "predator priests" abused more than 1,000 children in six dioceses since 1947.

Because the statute of limitations had run out on most of the crimes, only two priests have been charged as a result of the two-year-long investigation.

But the Pennsylvania report has prompted officials in several other states to open inquiries into allegations of sexual misconduct by Catholic clergy.

The Survivors Network of those Abuse by Priests has been asking for a federal investigation into the Catholic Church since 2003, during the church's last widespread scandal of clergy sex abuse.

David Clohessy, SNAP's former national director, said "as best we can tell" this is the first such federal probe into the Catholic Church in the United States targeting clergy sexual abuse. "And it is long overdue."

Dioceses respond

"This subpoena is no surprise considering the horrific misconduct detailed in the statewide grand jury report," said Jerome Zufelt, spokesman for the Diocese of Greensburg.

"Survivors, parishioners and the public want to see proof that every diocese has taken sweeping, decisive and impactful action to make children safer. We see this as another opportunity for the Diocese of Greensburg to be transparent."

The Archdiocese of Philadelphia likewise pledged to cooperate with the probe.

"The Archdiocese of Philadelphia has received a subpoena issued by a federal grand jury, which requires the production of certain documents. The archdiocese will cooperate with the United States Department of Justice in this matter," the archdiocese said.

The Diocese of Allentown said it "is responding to an information request contained in a subpoena from the US Attorney's Office for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania," adding, "The diocese will cooperate fully with the request, just as it cooperated fully with the information requests related to the statewide grand jury.

"The diocese sees itself as a partner with law enforcement in its goal to eliminate the abuse of minors wherever it may occur in society."

The Diocese of Erie also confirmed that it had received a subpoena. "Its counsel is in conversation with the Department of Justice. We will have no further comment at this time," a spokeswoman said.

A spokesperson for the US Attorney's Office for the Eastern District of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia told CNN, "The US Department of Justice generally does not confirm, deny or otherwise comment on the existence or nonexistence of an investigation."

Investigators in Buffalo seek documents about porn, source says

The Justice Department subpoenaed the Buffalo diocese in late May, a source with knowledge of the federal subpoena told CNN.

The source said the subpoena sought diocesan documentation regarding pornography, taking victims across state lines, and inappropriate use of cell phones and social media. The subpoena did not indicate toward what specific end this information was directed, the source said.

Bishop Richard Malone was frustrated the subpoena did not list specific names or the overall reason for the subpoena, the source added. Diocesan lawyers were not able to ascertain any more details despite negotiating to limit the documentation to living priests only, according to the source.

A spokeswoman for the Diocese of Buffalo said it received a request from the US attorney's office several months ago to review documents.

"A subpoena was provided and after some discussion, an agreement was reached to produce documents," communications director Kathy Spangler said. "We have heard nothing since early June. As far as we know, our response has nothing to do with the current Pennsylvania investigation that has just begun."

Barbara Burns, public affairs officer of the US Attorney's Office of the Western District of New York, told CNN by phone that the office cannot confirm nor deny investigations.

Officers pay it forward -- with doughnuts, of course!

Officers pay it forward -- with doughnuts, of course!

(CNN) - Police officers and doughnuts ... a love affair that dates back prior to the 1950s. But these Florida cops aren't hogging them all for themselves. Dozens of doughnuts made a roughly 200-mi ... Continue Reading
Police officers in the US were charged with more than 400 rapes over a 9-year period

Police officers in the US were charged with more than 400 rapes over a 9-year period

(CNN) - A police officer in Prince George County, Maryland, was charged this week with raping a woman during a traffic stop. He's pleaded not guilty, but it's a disturbing headline -- even more distu ... Continue Reading
5 things to know for October 19: Khashoggi, Pope & N. Korea, migrants, clergy abuse

5 things to know for October 19: Khashoggi, Pope & N. Korea, migrants, clergy abuse

(CNN) - Have you ever wanted to swim with swine? You can at the beach in the Bahamas that's something of a pig's paradise. Here's what else you need to know to Get Up to Speed and Out the Door. (Y ... Continue Reading
Doctor accused of sexually abusing children for years -- hospital says it became aware after he retired

Doctor accused of sexually abusing children for years -- hospital says it became aware after he retired

(CNN) - More than a dozen patients of the renowned Rockefeller University Hospital in New York say they were sexually abused by a former doctor when they were children, the New York Times reported. ... Continue Reading
Man confesses to 30-year-old killing. Police say he is a suspect in more deaths

Man confesses to 30-year-old killing. Police say he is a suspect in more deaths

(CNN) - A Pennsylvania man serving life in prison for the grisly murder of his wife and stepdaughter has confessed to another killing, resolving a cold case from the 1980s, officials said Thursday. ... Continue Reading
A Chicago postal worker vanished two weeks ago, and police suspect foul play

A Chicago postal worker vanished two weeks ago, and police suspect foul play

(CNN) - Earlier this month, US Postal Service letter carrier Kierra Coles left her Chicago apartment apparently dressed for work.A neighbor's surveillance video captured her walking past her vehic ... Continue Reading
93 more ex-students accuse former USC gynecologist of sexual misconduct, attorney says

93 more ex-students accuse former USC gynecologist of sexual misconduct, attorney says

LOS ANGELES (CNN) - Ninety-three additional women have come forward to accuse longtime University of Southern California gynecologist Dr. George Tyndall of sexual misconduct, according to the attorney in the case.

Tyndall was the only full-time gynecologist at the school's Student Health Clinic for 30 years.

Attorney John Manly said the 93 former students are represented in two new lawsuits.

The former students allege that USC ignored complaints about the doctor for decades, and concealed the doctor's actions.

Speaking to reporters Thursday, Manly called on California Attorney General Xavier Becerra to investigate USC. The attorney general's office declined to comment on the matter to CNN.

Tyndall's attorney, Leonard Levine, had no comment but said the doctor continues to cooperate in the investigation.

In July, after more than 50 accusers sued Tyndall and USC, Levine said in a statement that his client "is adamant that he engaged in no criminal conduct while practicing medicine at USC. He firmly believes that when all the facts are known, and experts in the field of gynecology and obstetrics are consulted, it will be determined (that) his examinations of students at USC were for the stated medical purpose, and consistent with the standard of care for such examinations," the statement said.

The women say they were sexually abused, harassed and molested by Tyndall, who was fired by the university in 2017 for inappropriate behavior, according to USC. University officials said the school reached a settlement with the doctor and did not report him to law enforcement or state medical authorities at the time.

In a statement to CNN, the university said, "We are aware of the lawsuits. We will be seeking a prompt and fair resolution that is respectful of our former students. We are committed to providing the women of USC with the best, most thorough and respectful health care services of any university."

At a press conference announcing the new lawsuit Thursday, two of the women victimized by Larry Nassar, the former USA Gymnastics doctor who was found guilty of sexual abuse, showed their support for the former USC students pressing charges against Tyndall.

Rachael Denhollander -- the first to publicly accuse Larry Nassar of assault -- urged USC to learn from what she called Michigan State University's mistakes.

"I am asking USC, do it better this time. Do it better than (MSU) did. Treat these women like the family you promised them they were. Conduct an independent investigation and release the report so we know who knew what, when and were, and those who contributed to the abuse of these women are held accountable."

The latest allegations are in line with some of the previous allegations against Tyndall. Several of these women claim they had never been to a gynecologist before seeing Dr. Tyndall and didn't realize his conduct wasn't medically legitimate until the first wave of lawsuits became public in May.

The women claim Tyndall made racist, derogatory and misogynistic comments while sexually abusing them "for no other reason than to satisfy his own prurient sexual desires."

Some of the claims against Tyndall include "groping Plaintiffs' breasts; digitally penetrating Plaintiffs' vaginas, sometimes without gloves and with unwashed hands; photographing Plaintiffs' genitals and naked bodies; exposing his own naked body to Plaintiffs...." Jane Doe 135 claims Tyndall engaged in rubbing the length of her naked body and pulled apart her buttocks "under the guise of a 'skin check.'"

The lawsuits claim Tyndall digitally penetrated these women forcibly for several minutes while commenting on how "tight" they were and on the size of their breasts. One complainant alleges Tyndall put his entire hand inside her vagina.

Jane Doe 126 claimed Tyndall digitally penetrated her so forcefully that she "bled profusely after her appointment." She also says that the doctor showed her "numerous photographs of other women's vaginas" and begged "Jane Doe 126 to let him photograph her naked vagina, for 'research.'"

Another plaintiff described as Jane Doe 128 said she saw Tyndall on at least four separate occasions between 2013 until in or around 2016. She claims while forcing his fingers inside her, Tyndall made racist comments about her ethnicity, telling her that "most Asian women have strong, tight vaginas." Jane Doe 128 alleges she asked a USC-employed nurse who was present during her appointments about Tyndall's behavior and whether it was normal, "the nurse dismissed Jane Doe 128's concerns, telling her that Tyndall was "just really friendly." Others like Jane Does 112, 113 and 127 also claim there was a USC-employed chaperone in the room who saw everything but said nothing.

After seeing Dr. Tyndall, Jane Doe 133 sent an email to USC's Student Health Center to complain about Tyndall but says she never received a reply. She claims she emailed a second time "to which the Student Health Center replied, 'We'll look into it.'" Jane Doe 133 doesn't know if USC ever took any action, the suit claims. She says the doctor made inappropriate comments like "your vagina is tiny" and "Your breasts are so big, like other Indians" after ordering her to strip completely naked and then "roughly moving his fingers in, out and around the inside of her vagina."

A friendly pact led a man to his neighbor, trapped 100 feet down in a mine

A friendly pact led a man to his neighbor, trapped 100 feet down in a mine

(CNN) - A simple pact among friends saved a man after he injured himself during a fall into a 100-foot mine shaft.

John Waddell, 62, had gone 48 hours without food or water when he was pulled early Thursday from a mine shaft on his property in western Arizona, authorities said.

He is a "very, very fortunate individual," said Roger Yensen, commander of the volunteer Mountain Rescue Posse who extracted him.

'Help, help!'

Waddell had made a deal with his neighbor, Terry Shrader, before he set off on Sunday: that Shrader would go looking for Waddell if he didn't return by Tuesday, Shrader told CNN affiliate KNXV.

With his friend still not back home, Shrader set off Wednesday to find him.

"As I pulled out my truck I could hear him hollering, 'Help, help!'" he told the station.

Shrader quickly alerted police about Waddell, who had broken several bones Monday in his fall, Sgt. Joaquin Enriquez of the Maricopa County Sheriff's Office said.

Yensen said last week, Waddell erected a metal structure over the top of the hole, called a derrick, so he could lower himself down by rope and explore the 8-10 foot wide shaft.

On Monday, as Waddell was lowering himself down, he lost control and fell roughly 50 feet to the bottom, he told rescuers.

He lay on the rocky bottom with multiple leg fractures for two days, awaiting rescue.

'Move cautiously and with purpose'

Waddell could be heard yelling at ground level, but officers among the first to arrive at the scene dropped a two-way radio into the shaft to communicate with him more easily.

"He was in good spirits and he was happy to see everybody there," Yensen said.

The rescuers worked to assemble a hauling system using the derrick and lowered a rescuer down into the dark mine shaft.

One of the biggest concerns was to not let rocks from the edge of the shaft fall on top of Waddell. "We move cautiously and with purpose at the edge of the mine shaft, to not cause anything to fall in," Yensen said.

"At the very end, when we brought him out of the hole, he just commented how smooth it was and really thanked us for the effort to get him out of the situation."

After Waddell was raised, he was airlifted to Banner University Hospital to receive emergency care for his non-life-threatening injuries.

Maricopa County Sheriff Paul Penzone said the actions of the posse "saved a life yesterday in a very challenging circumstance that had incredibly dangerous dynamics."

The mine shaft, near Eagle Eye Road and Mile Post 13, about a 35-minute drive south of Aguila, had fencing around it and is marked, Yensen said.

When it comes to mines, Yensen urged people to "stay out, stay alive."

Former Florida police officers land in prison after admitting to falsely arresting a teenager

Former Florida police officers land in prison after admitting to falsely arresting a teenager

(CNN) - Three Florida police officers were sentenced to prison this week for intentionally making false arrests for burglary, according to the Department of Justice.Former Biscayne Park Police Chi ... Continue Reading

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